New Jersey Requires Search Warrants To Get User Mobile Information

In an age when the United States government has seen fit to trample all over every single civil right afforded its people through the Bill of Rights, the Supreme Court in New Jersey took a stand and is now requiring its law enforcement to get search warrants for user data.

The law enforcement officers in New Jersey will no longer be able to simple "ask" mobile providers for tracking data on their customers. The authorities will have to show probable-cause and first attain a search warrant from the courts.

Chief Justice Stuart Roberts wrote in his opinion that "No one buys a cellphone to share detailed information about their whereabouts with the police," and that, "That was true in 2006 and is equally true today. Citizens have a legitimate privacy interest in such information."

This will not apply to law enforcement at the federal level, whose jack-booted thugs will continue to try to strip the American people of their basic rights of freedom at every turn, but it's at least a start. Kudos to the New Jersey Supreme Court on a good call.

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Source VentureBeat
Channels Internet, Phones, Politics
Topics Mobile, Privacy and Security, Technology and Law, Privacy, Courts
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